iEGSEMP at the Dinglinger Weinberg (Honorary Consulate of Korea)

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German-Korean Graduate School iEGSEMP welcomed by Diplomatic Corps.

We were pleased to be invited by the Honorary Consul of Korea, Dr. Christoph Hollenders and his wife Caroline Hollenders, to watch the annually Dampferparade from their beautiful vineyard “Dinglingers Weinberg”.

The event took place May 1st, one of the first sunny days of the year, and gave us the opportunity to speak to the Hollenders, explore their vineyard, enjoy their home-made wine and watch the steamers on the Elbe! The “Dinglingers Weinberg”, once the home of the court jeweller Johann Melchior Dinglinger, was built around 1700 and it contains the only preserved baroque Ball room in Dresden. It has now been carefully restored and is Dr. Hollenders’ private property.

We are very thankful for the organisation of – and invitation to – this great get together!

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Impressions from UNIST

IMG_4392My stay at UNIST is coming to an end. Since arriving here nearly 3 months ago, I observed the end of a presidency, the start of a beautiful spring and the continuation of missile threats. Now, the latter is not much of a topic in Korea and is certainly amplified in western media. But culminating in the impeachment process, it is nice to see a lively democratic
movement in this country and the cherry blossom in April is definitely something you have to see for yourself.
I was warmly welcomed by Prof. Kwang-Soo Kim and his group on day 1 at the Center for Superfunctional Materials. Over the course of two seminars I was able to present and explain the project and goals, which initiated interesting discussions. UNIST, established less than 10 years ago, is a very modern university aiming to attract top researches from all over the world – and as such the Campus is very international. Situated in a charming hilly landscape, the bus trip to the center of Ulsan takes almost one hour. But UNIST is a city by its own – with 5 convenience stores, over 4 cafeterias, coffee shops, stationary store, restaurants… and the list goes on. It is designed to focus.

However, you have to get out to see and feel the Korean culture. High-speed trains and super-punctual express buses are a treat. Ancient capital city Gyeongju, charming Daegu or the vibrant Busan are easy to reach and a must-see visit. Even Seoul is only a 2.5h KTX ride away. Indulge in Korean food and culture. Don’t miss San-nakji (산낙지), daege (대게) or one of the many BBQ places for Dak-galbi (닭갈비) or Samgyeopsal (삼겹살), together with a bottle of Soju (소주) or Makgeolli (막걸리).

I will leave you with some photos and get back to work: After discussing various mesoscopic silicon systems and their importance on future directions of nanoelectronics, we focussed on time-dependent transport calculation. In particular, electron transport in silicon dangling bond circuits. Consider a slab of pure Silicon, with its entire surface passivated by Hydrogen atoms. After removing single Hydrogens (e.g. by Scanning tunnelling microscope techniques), a dangling bond state appears on the (now depassivated) Silicon atom. This electronic state is localised, but can hybridise with neighbouring dangling bond states to extended states – and ultimately: wires. Those silicon dangling bond wires are 1D electronic states on the silicon surface, with an energy right inside the band gap of bulk silicon. Therefor, electron transport selectively through those DB states is possible. Thus, those channels can be used to construct arbitrary circuits: from loops, to logic gates, single-molecule contacts or more. Although many groups started working on this subject, transport properties of those systems are not yet well understood, especially in the time-dependent domain. Voltage pulses or AC fields demand for more sophisticated approaches, such as an extension of DFT to TD-DFT and the time-dependent Keldysh formalism TD-NEGF. Using the latter, we solve the problem by recasting the problem in terms of Green functions, where lot of work goes into adapting this to efficient numerical algorithms, such as the Auxiliary Mode Expansion by A. Croy. After implementation, this algorithm allows us to study the electric response to arbitrary time-dependent fields in real-sized DB systems. This is especially noteworthy, because many of the time-dependent studies are on simplistic toy models. However, multiple approaches exist for time-dependent electron transport. The group of Prof. Kwang-Soo Kim, together with Prof. Geunsik Lee, is specialised in a complementary method, called Dynamical Mean Field Theory, which can be combined with the NEGF approach. This theory allows to study strongly correlated materials, where DFT breaks down. Altogether, we developed a strong expertise on time-dependent electron transport with application beyond toy models, where both project partners complemented each other and pushed the research forward. PhD student Abdoreza Ershadiniai from Prof. Kim’s group will join us in Dresden later this year, further extending our collaboration. I also reached out personally to the other collaborators at UNIST, namely the group of Prof. Hyeon-Suk Shin and Prof. Rodney Ruoff of the Chemistry Department, who are delighted to be part of the project and look forward to the Dresden visits and German visitors.

다음에 또 봐요!

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POSTECH ranks third in THE ranking of Word’s best small universities!

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Times Higher Education (THE) has once again revealed the Best Small Universities across the globe, and heard directly from the students at some of those institutions about what they love most about attending a small college. To be eligible for the rankings, universities must appear in Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings 2016-17, teach more than four subjects, and have fewer than 5,000 students.

POSTECH University, part of our iEGSEMP consortium, climbed to rank 3, just after Caltech (US) and École Normale Supériore (France). THE states:

POSTECH was founded in 1986 as the first research-oriented university in South Korea. Since its inception, it has maintained its small size and reputation by admitting only 320 students every year through a highly selective process.

The structure and operation of POSTECH was inspired by Caltech, and it seems that this system of running a small science and technology research-focused university has worked well for both universities, as both have maintained their top five positions in the 2017 World’s Best Small University ranking.

POSTECH students hail the small classes and the fact that professors know them by name as one of the main reasons why they love studying there.

 

Click here to read the whole article on THE.

Seminar by Prof. Kwang-Soo Kim (UNIST), Dec. 15th

unist_chemistry_faculty_big_kim-kwang-sooWe are pleased to announce that Prof. Kwang-Soo Kim, one of our partner from UNIST University, is visiting us in December. He will give a seminar talk on December 15th at 1pm in Hallwachsstr. 3, Seminar room.

High-Performance Computing and Multi-Scale Simulations: Predictions for Excited Electrons and Ultrafast Electron-Ion Dynamics in Complex Materials

The success of novel molecular and material design depends on a comprehensive understanding of inherent atomic/molecular properties, interatomic/molecular interactions, and dynamic/transport properties of molecular/material systems. Here I elaborate on the interplay between theory and experiment to design superfunctional carbon-based nanomaterials and nanodevices. These include intriguing organic nanostructures, large-scale graphene, and functionalized carbon hybrid materials for energy harvesting, fuel cells, gas storage, water remediation, and medical treatment. Assembling phenomena of diverse nanostructures and utilization of the resulting unusual functional characteristics as devices are addressed. Selective sensing of fullerenes and fluorescence-sensing of RNA over DNA are achieved with π+-π, π-π interactions and charged hydrogen bonding. The temperature-driven transient molecular gating in covalent organic molecular frames can store gaseous molecules in ordered arrays toward unique collective properties. Using self-assembled nano-scale lenses, hyper-resolution phenomena showing near-field focusing and magnification beyond the diffraction limit are manifested Intriguing nanophotonics phenomena is also addressed. I will also elaborate on a recent development of Pt nanoclusters and nanodendrites in a genomic-double-stranded-DNA/reduced-graphene-oxide. Compared to state-of-the-art catalysts, the as-synthesized hybrid materials display outstanding catalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Moreover, the hybrid exhibited a constant mass activity for the ORR over a wide pH range 1-13. Super-paramagnetisim was exploited to remediate water with magnetite in graphene. I also discuss electron/spin transport phenomena in molecular electronic/spintronic devices and super-magnetoresistance of graphene nanoribbon spin valves using non-equilibrium Green function theory plugged in density functional theory. By utilizing Fano-resonance driven 2-dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy using graphene nanoribbon, the hyper-sensitive quantum conductance spectra of a graphene nanoribbon placed across a fluidic nanochannel can lead to fast DNA sequencing including cancerous methylated nucleobases detection. Along with this line, the development of attosecond spectroscopy to detect electronic motions in attosecond timescale is addressed. Finally, collective properties of liquids and solids are discussed based on ab initio many body molecular dynamics simulations. Phase transitions of materials and the limits of superheating and supercooling of vapor are studied with Monte Carlo simulations using microscopic models with configurational enthalpy as the order parameter so that water can be harvested in dry and hot conditions.

About the speaker

Kwang S. Kim is currently a Professor of chemistry, an Adjunct Professor in physics, and the Director of the Center for Superfunctional Materials of Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) in South Korea. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in applied chemistry from Seoul National University and another M.S. degree in physics from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology. He obtained his Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley. He spent a few years as an IBM Postdoctoral Fellow and as a Research Assistant Professor at Rutgers University. He joined POSTECH in 1988 (until Feb. 2014, Professor, POSTECH Fellow). He is a Fellow of the Korea Academy of Science and Technology. He is a Senior Editor of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A, B, C (Am. Chem. Soc.). He has been an Editorial Board Member of various journals including NPG Asia Materials (Nature Publishing Group), Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Computational Molecular Science (Wiley), Chemistry Letters (Chem. Soc. Japan), Journal of Computational Chemistry (Wiley-VCH), Chemistry – An Asian Journal (Wiley-VCH), and Computational and Theoretical Chemistry (Elsevier). He has been a Conference Board Member of the World Association of Theoretically Oriented Chemistry and the Asian Pacific Association of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry. His fields of research include investigations of density functional theory, ab initio calculations, nonequilibrium Green function theory, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations, first principles ground and excited-state molecular dynamics simulations, intermolecular interactions, clusters, molecular recognition, receptors, drug design, bioinformatics, biomolecules, nanomaterials, molecular devices, spintronics, and quantum computing.

Prof. Dr. Hyeon Suk Shin and Youngjin Park visiting TU Dresden

besuch-hyeon-sukYet another Korean-German partnership was established with the visit of the Director of UCRF (UNIST Central Research Facilities) Prof. Dr. Hyeon Suk Shin and his Ph.D. student Youngjin Park in the Physical Chemistry chair of Prof. Alexander Eychmüller (TU Dresden) on the 17th till 20th of October 2016. After a warm welcome, Prof. Eychmüller and his two Ph.D. candidates Christian Meerbach and Christoph Bauer were eager to discuss the organization of the intercultural exchange and the upcoming research with their Korean partners, which will focus on nanostructured monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) for material-efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Firstly focusing on the synthesis of copper chalcogenide Cu2-xA (A = S, Se, Te) nanosheets which will be employed as template in cation-exchange for a variety of 2D TMDs (such as MoA2, WA2, ZrA2, TiA2, etc.). We were then later discussing both groups cooperation Ph.D.student recent results on this topic to extract our overall knowledge and possible cooperating fields. In this both the Korean and German group demonstrated a successful preparation of copper chalcogenide nanosheets. Furthermore we showed different methods of cation exchange and an insight in the schlenk-line technique. To optimize our preparation skills the students worked together on the first cation-exchange in the laboratory.

After a conjoint lunch Prof. Dr. Hyeon Suk Shin presented his groups work on 2D-layered graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and TMDs.

During their stay in Dresden we also showed our Korean visitor the city’s famous sights and provided them with a small tour with some history background. Our guests highlight was the traditional food and beer at local restaurant Brauhaus Watzke.

 

iEGSEMP at the Korean-German Conference 2016

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The iEGSEMP members from Dresden took part in the Korean-German Conference on November 17th in Dresden. The conference is organized by the Alumni Network Gemany-Korea (ADeKo), the City of Dresden, the Dresden University of Technology (TU Dresden), the Science and Technology Policy Institute (STEPI), the RWTH Aachen University, Fraunhofer Society, Korea Institute of Science & Technology Evaluation and Planning (KISTEP) and The Korean Scientists and Engineers Association in the FRG (VeKNI), and offered valuable opportunity for lively discussions among international experts.

The main topics of the conference were 5G & Tactile Internet, Digital Products, E-Health, Energy Transition in Nano Electronics, Future Electronics and Robotics. Among many honourable guests, such as former Korean Prime minister Hwang-Sik Kim and Saxon Prime Minister Stanislaw Tillich we were happy to meet again Honorary consul Dr. Christoph Hollenders and his wife Caroline.

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iEGSEMP Officially Started

On Wednesday, November 2th we celebrated the official start of our iEGSEMP Graduate School. We were happy to welcome all iEGSEMP members from TU Dresden, the corresponding Professors, our special guest, the Honorary consul of the Republic of Korea, Dr. Christoph Hollenders, in addition to over 20 friends and colleagues in the Villa of the Graduate Academy. Thanks to the solo cellist Jin Kyung Kim we had a great musical start, with the master piece “Divertimento” by Krzysztof Penderecki (*1933). Dr. Hollenders then gave an interesting and entertaining overview of the bonds between Korea and Dresden, followed by the introduction of the program by the iEGSEMP Speaker Prof. Gianaurelio Cuniberti. After him, student coordinator Thomas Lehmann addressed a few organisational aspects of the graduate school and our PhD students Sangwook Park rounded off the event by presenting his work and how he sees the differences and similarities between the two countries of Germany and Korea. The subsequent poster session allowed everyone to connect and initiate discussions.

We would like to thank everyone involved in the organisation of the Kick Off and all guests who joined us for the event!

UPDATE: As we really liked the speech of Honorary Consul Dr. Hollenders we provide a transcript of it online.


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Startschuss für das Deutsch-Koreanische Graduiertenkolleg iEGSEMP

Einen weiteren Schritt vorwärts in Sachen internationaler Kooperation mit Korea ging am 02. November 2016 die TU Dresden. Mit einem offiziellen Kick-Off-Meeting erfolgte in der Villa der Graduiertenakademie der TU Dresden der offizielle Start des neu etablierten internationalen Graduiertenkollegs „International Excellence Graduate School on Emerging Materials and Processes“, kurz iEGSEMP. In der aus Mitteln des Zukunftskonzeptes der TU Dresden finanzierten Gruppe arbeiten auf deutscher Seite sieben Nachwuchsforscherinnen und –forscher im engen wissenschaftlichen Austausch mit ebenso vielen Kolleginnen und Kollegen in Korea gemeinsam an aktuellen Fragen der Materialforschung und –entwicklung.

Die Gründung dieses Kollegs wurde vor etwas mehr als einem Jahr im Beisein von Bundespräsident Joachim Gauck auf der Koreanisch-Deutschen Konferenz »Wissenschaft und Innovation« in Seoul beschlossen. Der Rektor der TU Dresden, Prof. Hans Müller-Steinhagen unterzeichnete dort zusammen mit den Präsidenten der koreanischen Spitzenforschungseinrichtungen POSTECH (Pohang University of Science and Technology), UNIST (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology) und der Yonsei University eine Absichtserklärung, die nun in die Tat umgesetzt wird.

An der TU Dresden bildet das iEGSEMP eine Schnittstelle von Aktivitäten der drei Professuren Physikalische Chemie (Prof. Alexander Eychmüller), Molekulare Funktionsmaterialien (Prof. Xinliang Feng) sowie Materialwissenschaft und Nanotechnik (Prof. Gianaurelio Cuniberti) und dem Fraunhofer-Institut IKTS (Dr. Jörg Opitz) und bündelt so interdisziplinär Fachkompetenzen aus Physik, Chemie und Werkstoffwissenschaft. Maßgebliches Ziel der Schule ist es, die bereits bestehenden langjährigen und erfolgreichen Kooperationen zwischen der TU Dresden und den Partnerinstitutionen in Korea durch die tägliche intensive Diskussion von jungen Wissenschaftlern zu stärken.

„Auch wenn in Zeiten von Skype und WhatsApp Distanzen zu verschwinden scheinen, ersetzt die digitale Kommunikation nicht den persönlichen Kontakt. Die deutschen und koreanischen Doktoranden des iEGSEMP werden hierzu für jeweils sechs Monate ins andere Partnerland gehen und ihre Forschungsarbeit in den Partnergruppen vor Ort vorantreiben.“ sagt Prof. Cuniberti, der die Schule koordinieren wird, und fährt fort: „Dadurch erhalten unsere Doktorandinnen und Doktoranden nicht nur eine exzellente wissenschaftliche Ausbildung, sondern machen wichtige Auslandserfahrungen in einem wirtschaftlich und wissenschaftlich führenden Land Asiens und bekommen interkulturelle Handlungskompetenzen vermittelt!“

Das Bild zeigt u.a. die beteiligten Professoren der TU Dresden, die sieben Mitglieder des Graduiertenkollegs iEGSEMP an der TU Dresden und den Honorarkonsul der Republik Korea, Notar Dr. Christoph Hollenders, bei der Auftaktveranstaltung an der TU Dresden am 2. November 2016. (Quelle: Robert Lohse )

UPDATE: Wir möchten jenen, die leider nicht dabei sein konnten, hier die sehr gelungene Ansprache des Honorarkonsuls Dr. Hollenders in Textform bereit stellen.

Korean-German Conference on Engineering for our Future, Nov. 16-18th

We would like to bring your attention to the Korean-German Conference on Engineering for our Future, held from November 16 – 18 in the International Congress Center Dresden.

The main topics of the conference will be: 5G & Tactile Internet, Digital Products, E-Health, Energy Transition in Micro-/(Nano-)Electronics, Future Electronics and Robotics. The conference is organized by the Alumni Network Gemany-Korea (ADeKo), the City of Dresden, the Dresden University of Technology (TU Dresden), the Science and Technology Policy Institute (STEPI), the RWTH Aachen University, Fraunhofer Society, Korea Institute of Science & Technology Evaluation and Planning (KISTEP) and The Korean Scientists and Engineers Association in the FRG (VeKNI). The conference will offer valuable opportunity for lively discussion among international experts.

All iEGSEMP Members from Dresden will take part in the conference to grow our network.

For more information, visit the official website: http://www.korean-german-conference.de

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Kick-Off Meeting, Nov. 2nd

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We would like to invite everyone who is interested to join us for our Kick-Off Meeting in Dresden on Wednesday, November 2th at 3:30 pm in the Villa of the Graduate Academy!
We prepared an interesting and entertaining program to introduce our new German-Korean Graduate School. Don’t miss it!

 

Letter of Intent signed on Korean-German International Graduate School

The scientific cooperation between Germany and Korea has been taken a further step forward. On 13 October 2015 in Seoul, a Letter of Intent on the establishment of an International Research Training Group entitled iEGSEMP Korea: International Excellence Graduate School on Emerging Materials and Processes, a joint project between Pohang University of Science and Technology, UNIST (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology), Yonsei University and Technische Universität Dresden, was signed.

For many years, there have been very close links between TU Dresden and partners in Korea. In March 2014, this connection was highlighted by the visit of the President of the Republic of Korea, Geun-hye Park, to Dresden and the honorary doctorate which she was awarded from TU Dresden. To foster further binational synergies, TU Dresden now teams up with renowned Korean research institutions to establish an International Research Training Group on Materials Science, a central field in academic and industrial research in both countries.

The formal signing ceremony took place alongside the Joint Korean German Conference “Science and Innovation”, which was attended by the German Federal President, Joachim Gauck. The foundation of the International Research Training Group was announced during the opening ceremony of this event and is recorded in the photograph of Federal President Gauck with Prof. Doh-Yeon Kim (Pohang University of Science and Technology), Prof. Mooyoung Jung (UNIST) and Prof. Hans Müller-Steinhagen (TU Dresden), the presidents of three of the four institutions involved.

The aim of the International Excellence Graduate School on Emerging Materials and Processes is to train ten PhD students, five from Germany and five from Korea, in a synergetic way in current topics of materials research for applications in electronics, energy and medical technologies. “I am very glad that we were able to establish this strong binational Graduate School to deepen our contacts with research partners in Korea,” said Prof. Hans Müller-Steinhagen, the Rector of TU Dresden, after signing the Letter of Intent and added: “The PhD students will be working on highly innovative topics and they will greatly benefit from the close cooperation within the network of excellent partners in Germany and Korea.” To allow them to gain international research experience and to promote the synergetic approach, the German and Korean PhD students will each spend six months at an institution in the partner country.

TU Dresden is among the top universities in Germany and Europe: strong in research, first-rate study programmes and close ties to culture, industry and society. TU Dresden was selected as one of eleven universities of excellence in the German government’s national Excellence Initiative. It is a modern comprehensive university with 14 departments and about 37,000 students.